Abdullah Alamin

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Abdullah Alamin
Aug 01, 2022
In Authors Forum
Doing your job well, your reports will make that clear to your stakeholder, usually in two ways: Things are going well and the report explains why. The campaign has hit a tough spot, and the report explains the underlying reasons and suggests clear next steps. I prefer to hear the first story, but both can inspire confidence and help you in your career. Unfortunately, it's all too easy to carelessly add the wrong visual to a report, making an unintended point and undermining your client's trust in you. A chart or graph always looks better than a boring chart, but if you display the wrong kind of chart, you may actually be fax number list making a point that you didn't intend. If you're lucky, present the report in person, and are quick, you might be able to fix the problem before it turns into more work. But if you're not so lucky, entire projects can be hijacked by a visual that takes the client down an unintended path. Now let me show you how the exact same data can be presented to make two entirely different points. Consider these two visuals with device-level data for the same account and date range: pie charts The pie charts above show that relatively little ad spend goes to tablets, and since the slice of the blue pie for value is larger than that for cost, this subtly indicates that
 For example, as demonstrated this week, Google was criticize content media
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